Breast and cervical cancer screening among rural midwestern latina migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

Journal of primary care & community health

PubMedID: 23803453

CastaƱeda SF, Rosenbaum RP, Gonzalez P, Holscher JT. Breast and cervical cancer screening among rural midwestern latina migrant and seasonal farmworkers. J Prim Care Community Health. 2012;3(2):104-10.
BACKGROUND
While cancer control and prevention efforts are well documented, limited information on this topic exists for Latina farmworkers in the rural Midwest. This study sought to examine correlates of breast cancer and cervical cancer screening practices of English- and Spanish-speaking Latina farmworkers in Michigan.

METHODS
Survey and anthropometric data were collected from a community-based cross-sectional sample of 173 Latina agricultural laborers in Michigan. Psychosocial-cultural and socioeconomic variables were examined as predictors of mammography and Papanicolaou screening.

FINDINGS
Results showed that individual characteristics that were significantly associated with having a Papanicolaou examination in the last 12 months included having higher language-based acculturation (odds ratio = 3.81), having ever done a breast self-examination (odds ratio = 2.82), and having health insurance (odds ratio = 5.58).

CONCLUSIONS
Acculturation, insurance, and performance of breast self-examination were key correlates of recent cervical cancer screening among Midwest Latina farmworkers. Findings suggest that education and targeted outreach strategies for Spanish-speaking Latina farmworker women in rural settings are urgently needed.