A comparison of pre-operative nutritional status with post-operative morbidity and mortality in obese esophageal surgery patients.

Advances in clinical and experimental medicine : official organ Wroclaw Medical University

PubMedID: 25491691

Ghosh S, Ittzés B, Bogár L, Kõszegi T, Horváth PO, Cseke L, Papp A, Márton S. A comparison of pre-operative nutritional status with post-operative morbidity and mortality in obese esophageal surgery patients. Adv Clin Exp Med. 2014;23(5):763-8.
OBJECTIVES
The nutrition state of obese patients scheduled to undergo esophageal surgery was evaluated using two nutritional score systems: the mini nutritional assessment (MNA) and the prognostic and nutritional index (PINI). A further comparison of various proteins, lymphocytes and cholesterol was performed using biochemical tests. These factors were compared with post-operative morbidity and mortality in a prospective, descriptive clinical study.

MATERIAL AND METHODS
The study included 34 obese patients undergoing esophagus resection due to cancer, who were examined over four years using both scoring systems to analyze whether nutritional status influences the outcome of surgery. The patients were divided into four groups based on the severity of the outcome and their MNA and PINI scores were analyzed.

RESULTS
There were no significant differences between the nutritional status of survivors and deceased patients. The European Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ESPEN) nutritional risk score was 1.35 ± 0.47 for Group I and 1.47 ± 0.58 for Group II (p = 0.62). With respect to severe morbidity there was no significant difference between Group III and Group IV: 2.01 ± 2.28 vs. 1.02 ± 3.67 (p = 0.54). Although there were minor differences, there were no major variations seen in the MNA or PINI scores comparing the four examined groups. No significant changes were observed in the biochemical parameters.

CONCLUSIONS
The study found no differences between post-operative morbidity or mortality and the pre-operative nutrition status of obese patients who underwent surgery due to esophageal cancer.