The effects of short-term high-intensity interval training vs. moderate-intensity continuous training on plasma levels of nesfatin-1 and inflammatory markers.

Hormone molecular biology and clinical investigation

PubMedID: 25581765

Ahmadizad S, Avansar AS, Ebrahim K, Avandi M, Ghasemikaram M. The effects of short-term high-intensity interval training vs. moderate-intensity continuous training on plasma levels of nesfatin-1 and inflammatory markers. Horm Mol Biol Clin Investig. 2015;21(3):165-73.
OBJECTIVES
Exercise training is an effective method of weight management, and knowing about its influence on the hormones involved in the regulation of food intake and inflammation could be useful for body weight management. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 6 weeks of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) and moderate-intensity continuous exercise training (MCT) on nesfatin-1, interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-a).

DESIGN AND METHODS
Thirty sedentary overweight men (Mean±SD; age, 25±1 years) were divided into three (n=10) body mass index-matched groups. The participants in the training groups performed either HIIT or MCT protocols 3 days per week for 6 weeks followed by a week of detraining.

RESULTS
Plasma IL-6 and TNF-a did not significantly change after training, but nesfatin increased significantly only with HIIT compared with the control group (p<0.05). In addition, fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), decreased significantly following both HIIT and MCT training (p<0.05). After a detraining period, the plasma nesfatin-1 did not return to pre-training levels in the HIIT group.

CONCLUSIONS
Both the HIIT and MCT groups had similar effects on inflammatory markers and insulin resistance in men who are overweight, but the HIIT seems to have better anorectic effects (as indicated by nesfatin) compared with MCT.