Relation of Cardiac Complications in the Early Phase of Community-Acquired Pneumonia to Long-Term Mortality and Cardiovascular Events.

The American journal of cardiology

PubMedID: 26089009

Cangemi R, Calvieri C, Falcone M, Bucci T, Bertazzoni G, Scarpellini MG, Barillà F, Taliani G, Violi F, SIXTUS Study Group, Battaglia S, Biliotti E, Calabrese CM, Casciaro M, De Angelis M, De Marzio P, Esvan R, Fazi L, Sulekova LF, Franchi C, Giordo L, Grieco S, Manzini Ms E, Marinelli P, Mordenti M, Morelli S, Palange P, Pastori D, Pignatelli P, Capparuccia MR, Romiti Ms GF, Rossi E, Ruscio Ms E, Russo A, Solimando Ms L, Trapè Ms S, Toriello Ms F. Relation of Cardiac Complications in the Early Phase of Community-Acquired Pneumonia to Long-Term Mortality and Cardiovascular Events. Am J Cardiol. 2015;.
Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is complicated by cardiac events in the early phase of the disease. AIM
of this study was to assess if these intrahospital cardiac complications may account for overall mortality and cardiovascular events occurring during a long-term follow-up.Three hundred one consecutive patients admitted to the University-Hospital, Policlinico Umberto I, with community-acquired pneumonia were prospectively recruited and followed up for a median of 17. 4 months. Primary end point was the occurrence of death for any cause, and secondary end point was the occurrence of cardiovascular events (cardiovascular death, nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI], and stroke). During the intrahospital stay, 55 patients (18%) experienced a cardiac complication. Of these, 32 had an MI (29 non-ST-elevation MI and 3 ST-elevation MI) and 30 had a new episode of atrial fibrillation (7 nonmutually exclusive events). During the follow-up, 89 patients died (51% of patients with an intrahospital cardiac complication and 26% of patients without, p <0. 001) and 73 experienced a cardiovascular event (47% of patients with and 19% of patients without an intrahospital cardiac complication, p <0. 001). A Cox regression analysis showed that intrahospital cardiac complications, age, and Pneumonia Severity Index were significantly associated with overall mortality, whereas intrahospital cardiac complications, age, hypertension, and diabetes were significantly associated with cardiovascular events during the follow-up. In conclusion, this prospective study shows that intrahospital cardiac complications in the early phase of pneumonia are associated with an enhanced risk of death and cardiovascular events during long-term follow-up.