Chaperone-assisted protein aggregate reactivation: Different solutions for the same problem.

Archives of biochemistry and biophysics

PubMedID: 26159839

Aguado A, Fernández-Higuero JA, Moro F, Muga A. Chaperone-assisted protein aggregate reactivation: Different solutions for the same problem. Arch Biochem Biophys. 2015;580121-134.
The oligomeric AAA+ chaperones Hsp104 in yeast and ClpB in bacteria are responsible for the reactivation of aggregated proteins, an activity essential for cell survival during severe stress. The protein disaggregase activity of these members of the Hsp100 family is linked to the activity of chaperones from the Hsp70 and Hsp40 families. The precise mechanism by which these proteins untangle protein aggregates remains unclear. Strikingly, Hsp100 proteins are not present in metazoans. This does not mean that animal cells do not have a disaggregase activity, but that this activity is performed by the Hsp70 system and a representative of the Hsp110 family instead of a Hsp100 protein. This review describes the actual view of Hsp100-mediated aggregate reactivation, including the ATP-induced conformational changes associated with their disaggregase activity, the dynamics of the oligomeric assembly that is regulated by its ATPase cycle and the DnaK system, and the tight allosteric coupling between the ATPase domains within the hexameric ring complexes. The lack of homologs of these disaggregases in metazoans has suggested that they might be used as potential targets to develop antimicrobials. The current knowledge of the human disaggregase machinery and the role of Hsp110 are also discussed.