A randomized controlled trial of a peer co-led dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program for gay men.

Behaviour research and therapy

PubMedID: 26342904

Brown TA, Keel PK. A randomized controlled trial of a peer co-led dissonance-based eating disorder prevention program for gay men. Behav Res Ther. 2015;741-10.
OBJECTIVE
Gay males have increased risk for eating disorders compared to heterosexual males, establishing a need to develop and empirically evaluate programs to reduce risk for this population. The present study investigated the acceptability and efficacy of a cognitive dissonance-based (DB) intervention (The PRIDE Body Project(©)) in reducing eating disorder risk factors among gay males in a university-based setting.

METHOD
Eighty-seven gay males were randomized to either a 2-session DB intervention (n = 47) or a waitlist control condition (n = 40). Participants completed eating disorder risk factor assessments pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at 4-week follow-up, and those receiving the intervention completed post-treatment acceptability measures.

RESULTS
Acceptability ratings were highly favorable. Regarding efficacy, the DB condition was associated with significantly greater decreases in body dissatisfaction, drive for muscularity, self-objectification, partner-objectification, body-ideal internalization, dietary restraint, and bulimic symptoms compared to waitlist control from pre- to post-intervention. Improvements in the DB group were maintained at 4-week follow-up, with the exception of body-ideal internalization. Body-ideal internalization mediated treatment effects on bulimic symptoms.

CONCLUSION
Results support the acceptability and efficacy of The PRIDE Body Project(©) and provide support for theoretical models of eating pathology in gay men.