Excessive Weight Gain during the First Year of Peritoneal Dialysis Is Associated with Inflammation, Diabetes Mellitus, and a Rapid Decrease in Residual Renal Function.

PloS one

PubMedID: 26406589

Kim JK, Kim YS, Song YR, Kim HJ, Kim SG, Moon SJ. Excessive Weight Gain during the First Year of Peritoneal Dialysis Is Associated with Inflammation, Diabetes Mellitus, and a Rapid Decrease in Residual Renal Function. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(9):e0139033.
OBJECTIVES
Significant weight gain is a potential problem in most patients starting peritoneal dialysis (PD); however, few studies have explored the clinical effects of increased body weight (BW) in these patients. We evaluated the effect of excess weight gain during the first year after PD on residual renal function (RRF).

METHODS
A total of 148 incident PD patients were analyzed in a longitudinal observational study. The mean duration of follow-up was 23.8 months. RRF was measured at baseline (within 1 month of starting PD) and thereafter at 6-month intervals for 2-3 years or until loss of RRF. BW was measured at the time of RRF measurement, and excess weight gain was defined as a BW increase over the median value (3.0%).

RESULTS
The median 1-year increase in BW was 2.3kg (IQR, 1.01-4.58) or 3.0% (IQR, 1.13-5.31). The mean slope of RRF decline was -0.068 ± 0.053 mL/min/month/1.73m2, and RRF loss developed in 48 patients at a mean follow-up time of 19.4 ± 6.8 months. Patients with BW increases > 3.0% showed significantly increased RRF decline rate compared to those without excess weight gain (p<0.001), and the BW increase (%/year) correlated significantly with higher hs-CRP levels and RRF decline rate. High systolic blood pressure, diabetes, large amount of proteinuria and excess BW gain significantly influenced the RRF decline rate. Also, it increased the risk of RRF loss by 4.17-fold (95% confidence intervals, 1.87-9.28; p<0.001).

CONCLUSIONS
Excess weight gain during the first year of PD was closely linked to systemic inflammation, diabetes and rapid decline in RRF.