Factors Associated With Truck Crashes in a Large Cross Section of Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers.

Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

PubMedID: 26461865

Thiese MS, Ott U, Robbins R, Effiong A, Murtaugh M, Lemke MR, Deckow-Schaefer G, Kapellusch J, Wood E, Passey D, Hartenbaum N, Garg A, Hegmann KT. Factors Associated With Truck Crashes in a Large Cross Section of Commercial Motor Vehicle Drivers. J Occup Environ Med. 2015;57(10):1098-106.
OBJECTIVE
This large, cross-sectional study calculated prevalence of disorders and assessed factors associated with self-reported lifetime crashes.

METHODS
Truck drivers (n?=?797) completed computerized questionnaires reporting crashes, demographics, psychosocial factors, and other elements, as well as had taken measurements (eg, height, weight, serum, and blood pressure).

RESULTS
Most drivers were male (n?=?685, 85.9%), and the mean body mass index was 32.9?±?7.5?kg/m with 493 (61.9%) being obese. Many drivers (n?=?326, 39.9%) experienced at least one, with 132 (16.6%) having multiple, lifetime, reportable crashes. Many factors were associated with crashes, including increasing age, increasing truck driving experience, male sex, alcohol, low back pain, heart disease, and feeling tense. The most consistent associations with crashes were pulse pressure, cell phone use, and feeling physically exhausted after work.

CONCLUSIONS
Modifiable factors associated with self-reported crashes were identified. These suggest targeted interventions may reduce risks of crashes.