Treatment of symptomatic convergence insufficiency with home-based computerized vergence system therapy in children.

Journal of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

PubMedID: 26486022

Huston PA, Hoover DL. Treatment of symptomatic convergence insufficiency with home-based computerized vergence system therapy in children. J AAPOS. 2015;19(5):417-21.
PURPOSE
To evaluate the efficacy of a home-based computer orthoptic program for symptomatic convergence insufficiency (CI) in children.

METHODS
The medical records of participants aged 5 to <18 years who were diagnosed with symptomatic CI and were treated with the Computerized Vergence System (CVS) program were retrospectively reviewed. All participants were prescribed 9 or 15 minutes of daily convergence exercises with the CVS program, 5 days per week, for the initial 6 weeks. Near point of convergence (NPC) and near convergence amplitude (NCA) were measured at baseline, 6 week, and final examinations. The presence or absence of diplopia and asthenopia with reading were recorded at baseline and final examinations.

RESULTS
A total of 186 participants were included. At diagnosis, 72 participants (39%) reported diplopia and 182 (98%), reported asthenopia. At final examination, 172 participants (92%) were asymptomatic. Twelve participants (6%) subsequently received other treatment modalities. Mean NPC at baseline (5.9 cm) improved after 6 weeks of CVS therapy (3.3 cm) and at final examination (2.9 cm; P < 0.0005). Mean NCA at baseline (20.3(?)) improved after 6 weeks of CVS therapy (37.0(?)) and at the final examination (38.0(?); P < 0.0005).

CONCLUSIONS
In this study, home-based CVS therapy reduced symptoms related to CI and improved the NPC and NCA of most children aged 5 to <18 years with symptomatic CI.