Using communication privacy management theory to examine HIV disclosure to sexual partners/spouses among PLHIV in Guangxi.

AIDS care

PubMedID: 26616128

Xiao Z, Li X, Qiao S, Zhou Y, Shen Z, Tang Z. Using communication privacy management theory to examine HIV disclosure to sexual partners/spouses among PLHIV in Guangxi. AIDS Care. 2015;27 Suppl 173-82.
The current study employed Communication Privacy Management (CPM) theory to examine the factors associated with disclosure of HIV infection to sexual partners or spouses as well as gender differences in these associations among a sample of people living with HIV (PLHIV) in China. A total of 1254 PLHIV who had 5-16 years old children were invited to answer the questions related to disclosure of HIV infection to sexual partners/spouses. Prevalence of HIV disclosure was reported. Key variables related to CPM theory (such as motivations for disclosure and nondisclosure, HIV-related stigma, and relational factors) were compared between females and males. Logistic regression was employed to determine the factors of influencing whether or not the participants disclosed their HIV status to spouses/partners for the male, the female and the combined samples. Fear of rejection was a significant predictor of HIV nondisclosure for the male, the female and the combined samples. Concern about privacy was a significant factor in not disclosing to sexual partners/spouses only in the male sample. The endorsement of duty to inform/educate was the only motivation factor that was significantly related to HIV disclosure for the three samples. The motivation to establish a close/supportive relationship with intimate partners/spouses was found to be associated with HIV disclosure for the combined and male samples. The current study confirmed the utilities of CPM in studying HIV disclosure to sexual partners/spouse. The findings have theoretical and practical implications for HIV disclosure interventions among PLHIV in Guangxi.