Isolation and Genetic Characterization of Mangshi Virus: A Newly Discovered Seadornavirus of the Reoviridae Family Found in Yunnan Province, China.

PloS one

PubMedID: 26630378

Wang J, Li H, He Y, Zhou Y, Meng J, Zhu W, Chen H, Liao D, Man Y. Isolation and Genetic Characterization of Mangshi Virus: A Newly Discovered Seadornavirus of the Reoviridae Family Found in Yunnan Province, China. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(12):e0143601.
BACKGROUND
Seadornavirus is a genus of viruses in the family Reoviridae, which consists of Banna virus, Kadipiro virus, and Liao ning virus. Banna virus is considered a potential pathogen for zoonotic diseases. Here, we describe a newly discovered Seadornavirus isolated from mosquitos (Culex tritaeniorhynchus) in Yunnan Province, China, which is related to Banna virus, and referred to as Mangshi virus.

METHODS AND RESULTS
The Mangshi virus was isolated by cell culture in Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells, in which it replicated and caused cytopathic effects, but not in mammalian BHK-21 or Vero cells. Polyacrylamide gel analysis revealed a genome consisting of 12 segments of double-stranded RNA, with a "6-4-2" pattern in which the migrating bands were different from those of the Banna virus. Complete genome sequencing was performed by full-length amplification of cDNAs. Sequence analysis showed that seven highly conserved nucleotides and three highly conserved nucleotides were present at the ends of the 5'- and 3'-UTRs in each of 12 genome segments. The amino acid identities of Mangshi virus shared with Balaton virus varied from 27.3% (VP11) to 72.3% (VP1) with Banna virus varying from 18.0% (VP11) to 63.9% (VP1). Phylogenetic analysis based on amino acid sequences demonstrated that Mangshi virus is a member of the genus Seadornavirus and is most closely related to, but distinct from, Balaton virus and Banna virus in the genus Seadornavirus of the family Reoviridae.

CONCLUSION
Mangshi virus isolated from mosquitoes (C. tritaeniorhynchus) was identified as a newly discovered virus in the genus Seadornavirus and is phylogenetically close to Banna virus, suggesting that there is genetic diversity of seadornaviruses in tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia.