Tracking SVOCs' Transfer from Products to Indoor Air and Settled Dust with Deuterium-Labeled Substances.

Environmental science & technology

PubMedID: 27019300

Sukiene V, Gerecke AC, Park YM, Zennegg M, Bakker MI, Delmaar CJ, Hungerb├╝hler K, von Goetz N. Tracking SVOCs' Transfer from Products to Indoor Air and Settled Dust with Deuterium-Labeled Substances. Environ Sci Technol. 2016;.
Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can be released from products and distributed in the indoor environment, including air and dust. However, the mechanisms and the extent of substance transfer into air and dust are not well understood. Therefore, in a small-scale field study the transfer of nine SVOCs was investigated: Four artificial consumer products were doped with eight deuterium-labeled plasticizers (phthalates and adipates) and installed in five homes to investigate the emission processes of evaporation, abrasion, and direct transfer. Intentional release was studied with a commercial spray containing a pyrethroid. During the 12 week study, indoor air and settled dust samples were collected and analyzed. On the basis of our measurement results, we conclude that the octanol-air partitioning coefficient Koa is a major determinant for the substance transfer into either air or dust: A high Koa implies that the substance is more likely to be found in dust than in air. The emission process also plays a role: For spraying, we found higher dust and air concentrations than for evaporation. In contrast, apartment parameters like air exchange rate or temperature had just a minor influence. Another important mechanistic finding was that although transfer from product to dust currently is postulated to be mostly mediated by air, direct transport from product to dust on the product surface was also observed.