Production of interleukin-4 in CD133+ cervical cancer stem cells promotes resistance to apoptosis and initiates tumor growth.

Molecular medicine reports

PubMedID: 27121303

Liu CT, Xin Y, Tong CY, Li B, Bao HL, Zhang CY, Wang XH. Production of interleukin-4 in CD133+ cervical cancer stem cells promotes resistance to apoptosis and initiates tumor growth. Mol Med Rep. 2016;.
The cancer stem cell (CSC) theory suggests that cancer growth and invasion is dictated by the small population of CSCs within the heterogenous tumor. THE AIM
of the present study was to elucidate the cause for chemotherapy failure and the resistance of CSCs to apoptosis.A total of ~2. 3% cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells were identified in cases of uterine cervical cancer. These CD133+ SP cells were found to potently initiate tumor growth and invasion, as they exhibit transcriptional upregulation of stemness genes, including octamer-binding transcription factor-4, B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site-1, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, (sex determining region Y)-box 2, Nestin and anti-apoptotic B cell lymphoma-2. In addition, the CD133+ SP cells showed resistance to multi-drug treatment and apoptosis. The present study further showed that the secretion of interleukin-4 (IL-4) in CD133+ cervical cancer SP cells promoted cell proliferation and prevented the SP cells from apoptosis. Following the neutralization of IL-4 with anti-IL-4 antibody, the CD133+ SP cells were more sensitive to drug treatment and apoptosis. Therefore, the data obtained in the present study suggested that the autocrine secretion of IL-4 promotes increased survival and resistance to cell death in CSCs.