Chronic persistent parvovirus B19 bone marrow infection resulting in transfusion-dependent pure red cell aplasia in multiple myeloma after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and severe graft versus host disease.

Hematology (Amsterdam, Netherlands)

PubMedID: 27311084

Karrasch M, Schmidt V, Hammer A, Hochhaus A, Rosée P, Petersen I, Sauerbrei A, Baier M, Sayer HG, Hermann B. Chronic persistent parvovirus B19 bone marrow infection resulting in transfusion-dependent pure red cell aplasia in multiple myeloma after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and severe graft versus host disease. Hematology. 2016;1-6.
INTRODUCTION
We report a chronic persistent Parvovirus B19 (PVB19) infection despite long-term immunoglobulin substitution intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and tapering of immune-suppressive therapy in a 41-year-old patient after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) and long-term immune-suppressive therapy due to a steroid-refractory graft versus host disease (GvHD).

CLINICAL COURSE
More than 18 month after alloHSCT the patient acquired a de novo transfusion-dependent pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) due to a PVB19 infection. Despite prompt tapering of GvHD-directed therapy and application of various IVIG regimens, transfusion-dependent anaemia (fourerythrocyte concentrates a month) persisted, and a high PVB19 replication is still evident for more than 3.5 years. Virological analysis at different time points showed a very high PVB19 load in the blood (range: 6.79E9-1.56E11), as well as highly elevated PVB19-IgG (range: 1.95-3.34) and -IgM (range: 1.97-9.74) levels in serology testing. Other virological parameters were not significantly elevated. After 30 months, a bone marrow (BM) examination still revealed a highly dysplastic erythropoiesis without any cellular maturation, and a high-grade expression of PVB19 within the dysplastic erythropoietic progenitor cells, consistent with a PRCA due to a PVB19 infection of the BM. We suggest that PRCA was most probably caused by a primary PVB19 infection of unknown source following alloHSCT with a PVB19-negative donor.

CONCLUSION
PRCA due a PVB19 infection of the BM may persist over a long-time, despite prolonged administration of various IVIG regimen and tapering of GvHD-directed therapy. The case emphasizes the importance of PVB19 monitoring in heavily pre-treated haematological patients. Currently, PVB19-directed treatment options are extremely limited and optimized therapeutic strategies are urgently needed.