Towards an Inclusive and Evidence-Based Definition of the Maternal Mortality Ratio: An Analysis of the Distribution of Time after Delivery of Maternal Deaths in Mexico, 2010-2013.

PloS one

PubMedID: 27310260

Lamadrid-Figueroa H, Montoya A, Fritz J, Olvera M, Torres LM, Lozano R. Towards an Inclusive and Evidence-Based Definition of the Maternal Mortality Ratio: An Analysis of the Distribution of Time after Delivery of Maternal Deaths in Mexico, 2010-2013. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(6):e0157495.
Progress towards the Millennium Development Goal No. 5 was measured by an indicator that excluded women who died due to pregnancy and childbirth after 42 days from the date of delivery. These women suffered from what are defined as late deaths and sequelae-related deaths (O96 and O97 respectively, according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision). Such deaths end up not being part of the numerator in the calculation of the Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR), the indicator that governments and international agencies use for reporting. The issue is not trivial since these deaths account for a sizeable fraction of all maternal deaths in the world and show an upward trend over time in many countries. THE AIM
of this study was to analyze empirical data on maternal deaths that occurred between 2010 and 2013 in Mexico, linking databases of the Deliberate Search and Reclassification of Maternal Deaths (BIRMM) and the Birth Information Subsystem (SINAC) of the Ministry of Health.

DATA
were analyzed by negative binomial regression, survival analysis and multiple cause analysis.While the reported MMR decreased by 5% per year between 2010 and 2013, the MMR due to late and sequelae-related deaths doubled from 3. 5 to 7 per 100,000 live-births in 2013 (p <0. 01). A survival analysis of all maternal deaths revealed nothing particular around the 42 day threshold, other than the exclusion of 18% of women who died due to childbirth in 2013. The multiple cause analysis showed a strong association between the excluded deaths and obstetric causes. It is suggested to review the construction of the MMR to make it a more inclusive and dignified measurement of maternal mortality by including all deaths due to pregnancy and childbirth into the Maternal Death definition.