Microsurgical management of primary jugular foramen meningiomas: a series of 22 cases and review of the literature.

Neurosurgical review

PubMedID: 27334626

Tang J, Zhang L, Zhang J, Wu Z, Xiao X, Zhou D, Jia G, Jia W. Microsurgical management of primary jugular foramen meningiomas: a series of 22 cases and review of the literature. Neurosurg Rev. 2016;.
This study summarized clinical manifestations, surgical management, histological grading, and long-term outcome of jugular foramen meningiomas (JFMs). Retrospective study was performed in 22 consecutive patients with primary JFMs from January 2004 to October 2010, enrolling 10 men and 12 women with average age of 39. 4 (14-57 years). The most common initial symptom is hearing disorder, followed by lower cranial nerve dysfunctions. The tumor was classified into type I (intracranial) in 1, type II (intracranial) in 15, type IV (intracranial-extracranial) in 6, and none type III (extracranial). Surgical approaches mainly included retrosigmoid in 7, far lateral in 10, and juxtacondylar in 5, with some variations. The gross total resection was achieved in 15 cases and subtotal resection in 7. Fourteen patients (63. 6 %) developed new or worse neurological deficits immediately after operation, of whom 11 (78. 6 %) got alleviation. Postoperatively, keeping airway patency and prevention from aspiration pneumonia is very important. Nasotracheal intubation is much more tolerated than orotracheal intubation for postoperative patient management. WHO grade 2 was found in four cases (18. 2 %) and grade 3 in one. During the average time of follow-up in 83. 2 months, only one (grade 3) died of tumor regrowth 20 months after surgery and radiosurgery. Five of 17 patients of grade 1 developed tumor regrowth. Radiosurgery provides a good tumor control for tumor regrowth in grade 1, or postoperative grade 2 tumor. In conclusion, JFMs has a favorable long-term overall survival; however, neurological preservation is still challenging, especially low cranial nerves.