Impact of chronic kidney disease on clinical outcomes in patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction receiving percutaneous coronary intervention - A five-year observational study.

International journal of cardiology

PubMedID: 27379919

Wang HT, Chen YL, Wu CJ. Impact of chronic kidney disease on clinical outcomes in patients with non-ST elevation myocardial infarction receiving percutaneous coronary intervention - A five-year observational study. Int J Cardiol. 2016;220166-172.
BACKGROUND
Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) experience poor outcomes after acute myocardial infarction. This study investigated how CKD affects clinical outcomes in patients with non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) receiving PCI.

METHODS
This retrospective study analyzed record-linked data for 314 patients who had received PCI for NSTEMI between January 2008 and September 2010. The 141 patients with advanced CKD were compared with 173 patients who had mild or no CKD. The primary endpoint was long-term mortality. The secondary endpoint was long-term major adverse cardiac events.

RESULTS
Compared to the control group, the advanced CKD group had older patients, more females, and more patients with diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The advanced CKD group also had a lower left ventricular ejection fraction and more patients with advanced HF and pulmonary edema. The advanced CKD group and the control group did not significantly differ in total in-hospital mortality, cardiac death or temporary hemodialysis post-PCI. The advanced CKD group had a significantly higher rate of long-term events. Finally, multiple stepwise Cox regression analysis showed that old age, advanced CKD and advanced HF were independent predictors of primary endpoint. The best predictors of secondary endpoint were post-PCI Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction-3 flow, multiple vessel disease, advanced HF and advanced CKD.

CONCLUSIONS
In NSTEMI patients undergoing PCI, in-hospital mortality does not significantly differ between patients with and without advanced CKD. However, long-term follow up of CKD patients consistently reveals poor outcomes.