Early detection of parenting and developmental problems in young children: Non-randomized comparison of visits to the well-baby clinic with or without a validated interview.

International journal of nursing studies

PubMedID: 27423790

Staal II, van Stel HF, Hermanns JM, Schrijvers AJ. Early detection of parenting and developmental problems in young children: Non-randomized comparison of visits to the well-baby clinic with or without a validated interview. Int J Nurs Stud. 2016;621-10.
OBJECTIVE
Determine whether the early detection of parenting problems and developmental problems in young children improves with the help of a validated structured interview.

DESIGN
Non-randomized controlled trial held from December 2006 until January 2008.

SETTING
Preventive child health care services in the Netherlands.

PARTICIPANTS
4438 eligible 18-month-old children and their parents.

INTERVENTIONS
A visit to the well-baby clinic with and without (usual care) the use of a validated structured interview for the early detection of parenting problems and developmental problems in young children: the Structured Problem Analysis of Raising Kids.

OUTCOME MEASURES
The primary outcome consists of the difference in the number of 18-month-old children with high or increased risk for parenting and developmental problems. Secondary outcomes are the differences in care needs as expressed by child health care nurses, the percentage of parents and other children of the family attending, follow-up actions, the scores of parent report questionnaires and the time needed for the consultation. Data were analyzed by means of ordinal regression with propensity score adjustment.

RESULTS
Certain discrepancies were noticed: during usual care visits, nurses found fewer children with high (1.2 versus 2.6%) or increased risk (14.5 versus 20.7%) than during visits in which the Structured Problem Analysis of Raising Kids was used (p=0.002), but they also indicated that more help was needed. Conversely, no additional contacts were advised for 25% of the children whom the nurses in the care-as-usual group labelled as high risk, while all high-risk children visited with the Structured Problem Analysis of Raising Kids received additional contacts.

CONCLUSIONS
The Structured Problem Analysis of Raising Kids, a validated structured interview, improves the early detection of parenting and child-developmental problems in young children, compared to regular visits without an instrument. Structuring the collection of information about parents' concerns and care needs gives nurses information beyond their professional viewpoint and results in joint decisions that better match parental care needs and risk levels determined.

TRIAL REGISTRATION
www.trialregister.nl. Identifier: NTR1413.