The effect of using an abdominal binder on postoperative gastrointestinal function, mobilization, pulmonary function, and pain in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled trial.

International journal of nursing studies

PubMedID: 27474943

Arici E, Tastan S, Can MF. The effect of using an abdominal binder on postoperative gastrointestinal function, mobilization, pulmonary function, and pain in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery: A randomized controlled trial. Int J Nurs Stud. 2016;62108-117.
BACKGROUND
Evidence on the effectiveness of using a binder following abdominal surgery and its effect on gastrointestinal function, mobilization, pulmonary function, and pain is currently unclear.

OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of abdominal binder usage on gastrointestinal function, mobilization, pulmonary function, and postoperative pain in patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.

DESIGN
This research was conducted as a randomized controlled trial.

SETTINGS
The study was conducted at the Department of General Surgery at a military education and research hospital in Ankara, Turkey, between September 2013 and April 2014.

PARTICIPANTS
104 patients were assessed for eligibility. The study was conducted on 84 eligible patients.

METHODS
The study sample consisted of 84 patients who underwent effective major abdominal surgery. The patients were randomized into two groups, the intervention group, which used an abdominal binder and the control group, which did not. Gastrointestinal function, mobilization, pulmonary function, and the pain status of both groups were evaluated on the first, fourth, and seventh days before and after surgery, and the intergroup results were compared.

RESULTS
No significant difference was found between the two groups in terms of gastrointestinal and pulmonary function on the first, fourth, and seventh days following surgery (p>0.05). A comparative assessment of mobility by walking distance showed that patients in the intervention group were able to walk further on the fourth [mean (SD); 221.19 (69.08) m] and seventh [227.85 (60.02) m] days after surgery (p=0.003, p<0.001). There were differences in the acute pain status between patients in both groups (p<0.05). On the first [mean (SD); 8.80 (5.03)], fourth [4.83 (2.78)], and seventh [3.09 (3.17)] days after surgery, the sensory sub-scale pain scores were higher in the control group (p<0.001). On the first [mean (SD); 10.16 (6.14)], fourth [5.28 (3.52)], and seventh [3.30 (3.51)] days after surgery the total pain scores were higher in the control group (p<0.001). The visual analogue scale scores were also higher in the control group on the first [mean (SD) 6.26 (1.86)], fourth [4.50 (2.10)], and seventh [3.04 (2.43)] days after surgery (p<0.001).

CONCLUSION
The study's findings reveal that the use of an abdominal binder does not have any effect on postoperative gastrointestinal and pulmonary function. However, an abdominal binder increases patient mobility soon after surgery. There was also a measurable effect on pain, with lower scores reported by patients who used an abdominal binder after any exercise or activity. These results indicate that the use of a routine abdominal binder is helpful for patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.