Efficacy and Safety of Liraglutide Added to Capped Insulin Treatment in Subjects With Type 1 Diabetes: The ADJUNCT TWO Randomized Trial.

Diabetes Care

PubMedID: 27493132

Ahrén B, Hirsch IB, Pieber TR, Mathieu C, Gómez-Peralta F, Hansen TK, Philotheou A, Birch S, Christiansen E, Jensen TJ, Buse JB, ADJUNCT TWO investigators. Efficacy and Safety of Liraglutide Added to Capped Insulin Treatment in Subjects With Type 1 Diabetes: The ADJUNCT TWO Randomized Trial. Diabetes Care. 2016;39(10):1693-701.
OBJECTIVE
To investigate the efficacy and safety of liraglutide added to capped insulin doses in subjects with type 1 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
A 26-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group trial enrolling 835 subjects randomized 3:1 receiving once-daily subcutaneous liraglutide (1.8, 1.2, and 0.6 mg) or placebo added to an individually capped total daily dose of insulin.

RESULTS
Mean baseline glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) (8.1% [65.0 mmol/mol]) was significantly decreased with liraglutide versus placebo at week 26 (1.8 mg: -0.33% [3.6 mmol/mol]; 1.2 mg: -0.22% [2.4 mmol/mol]; 0.6 mg: -0.23% [2.5 mmol/mol]; placebo: 0.01% [0.1 mmol/mol]). Liraglutide significantly reduced mean body weight (-5.1, -4.0, and -2.5 kg for 1.8, 1.2, and 0.6 mg, respectively) versus placebo (-0.2 kg). Significant reductions in daily insulin dose and increases in quality of life were seen with liraglutide versus placebo. There were higher rates of symptomatic hypoglycemia (21.3 vs. 16.6 events/patient/year; P = 0.03) with liraglutide 1.2 mg vs. placebo and of hyperglycemia with ketosis >1.5 mmol/L with liraglutide 1.8 mg vs. placebo (0.5 vs. 0.1 events/patient/year; P = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS
In a broad population of subjects with long-standing type 1 diabetes, liraglutide added to capped insulin reduced HbA1c, body weight, and insulin requirements but with higher rates of hypoglycemia for liraglutide 1.2 mg and hyperglycemia with ketosis for liraglutide 1.8 mg.