The effect of temperature exposure during shipment on a commercially available demineralized bone matrix putty.

Cell and tissue banking

PubMedID: 27562800

Schallenberger M, Lovick H, Locke J, Meyer T, Juda G. The effect of temperature exposure during shipment on a commercially available demineralized bone matrix putty. Cell Tissue Bank. 2016;.
During August and September of 2013, temperature data loggers were shipped to and from an AATB accredited and FDA registered allograft tissue processing facility in Belgrade, MT (Bacterin International, Inc. ) to five warm climate cities (Dallas, TX, El Paso, TX, New Orleans, LA, Phoenix, AZ, and Tampa, FL). Shipping data acquired from 72 independent shipments were analyzed to generate an assessment of temperature exposure, shipment times, and shipping event durations experienced during routine distribution. Overall the packages experienced an average temperature of 26. 2 ± 2. 3 °C which mirrored the average external ambient temperature of 25. 8 ± 3. 0 °C. However, temperature spikes above 40 °C were frequently observed. The data from the model shipments were extrapolated to provide a worst-case high temperature spike of 52. 9 °C for 12 h and 14 min. Multiple lots of a commercially available demineralized bone matrix (DBM) putty (OsteoSelect(®) DBM Putty) were subjected to continuous heating at 50 °C, to multiple worst-case temperature spikes, and to multiple freeze-thaw cycles to assess the effects of these temperature extremes on the handling and osteoinductivity of the allograft tissue. Five weeks of continuous exposure to 50 °C and 12 simulated worst-case one-way shipments did not adversely affect the handling characteristics or the in vivo osteoinductivity of the product.