Effect of Breastfeeding Practices and Maternal Nutrition on Baby's Weight Gain During First 6 Months.

Journal of obstetrics and gynaecology of India

PubMedID: 27651626

Kajale NA, Chiplonkar SA, Khadilkar V, Khadilkar AV. Effect of Breastfeeding Practices and Maternal Nutrition on Baby's Weight Gain During First 6 Months. J Obstet Gynaecol India. 2016;66(Suppl 1):335-9.
OBJECTIVE
To study cross-sectionally, effect of early feeding practices and maternal nutrition, with special reference to traditional food supplements (TFSs), on baby's weight gain during first 6 months.

METHODS


DESIGN
Cross-sectional observational study design.

SETTINGS
Urban tertiary healthcare centre, India.

PARTICIPANTS
One hundred and fifteen primiparous mother-infant pairs within 6 months of delivery.

OUTCOME MEASURES
We studied the subjects for anthropometry, feeding practices and nutrient intakes after delivery, and their baby's weights were measured, and WAZ scores from WHO Anthro software and weight gain from birth were calculated.

RESULTS
Eighty per cent women from partial breastfeeding (PBF) group were either overweight or obese, while 33 % of exclusively breastfeeding (EBF) group were normal weight. To further explore relationship between TFS intakes and babies' feeding status, study population were divided into four groups based on consumption of TFS and feeding practices. General linear univariate model analysis adjusted with pre-pregnancy BMI, gestational weight gain, infant age and birth weight showed highest weight gain (3.8 ± 0.3 kg) for TFS + PBF group, than other groups such as TFS + EBF group (2.9 ± 0.3 kg, p = 0.043) and NTS + EBF (2.7 ± 0.3 kg, p = 0.017), though NTS + PBF group also had lower weight gain, but this difference was not significant (3.4 ± 0.3 kg, p = 0.489).

CONCLUSION
Higher baby's weight gain was seen among partially breastfed babies. Rather than TFS, type of feeding affected baby weight gain to a greater extent which may increase baby's risk of obesity in future.