Sub-optimality in motor planning is retained throughout 9 days practice of 2250 trials.

Scientific reports

PubMedID: 27869198

Ota K, Shinya M, Kudo K. Sub-optimality in motor planning is retained throughout 9 days practice of 2250 trials. Sci Rep. 2016;637181.
Optimality in motor planning, as well as accuracy in motor execution, is required to maximize expected gain under risk. In this study, we tested whether humans are able to update their motor planning. PARTICIPANTS
performed a coincident timing task with an asymmetric gain function, in which optimal response timing to gain the highest total score depends on response variability.Their behaviours were then compared using a Bayesian optimal decision model. After 9 days of practicing 2250 trials, the total score increased, and temporal variance decreased. On the other hand, the participants showed consistent risk-seeking or risk-averse behaviour, preserving suboptimal motor planning. These results suggest that a human's computational ability to calculate an optimal motor plan is limited, and it is difficult to improve it through repeated practice with a score feedback.