Accuracy of Offspring-Reported Parental Hip Fractures: A Novel Population-Based Parent-Offspring Record Linkage Study.

American Journal of Epidemiology

PubMedID: 28430851

Lix LM, Leslie WD, Yang S, Yan L, Walld R, Morin SN, Majumdar SR, Roos LL. Accuracy of Offspring-Reported Parental Hip Fractures: A Novel Population-Based Parent-Offspring Record Linkage Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2017;185(10):974-981.
The objective of this study was to test the validity of offspring-reported parental hip fracture in a unique bone mineral density (BMD) registry linked to administrative databases spanning 4 decades. Population-based data were from Manitoba, Canada, and included hospital abstracts, health insurance registrations, and the provincewide BMD registry. The cohort included individuals aged =40 years with BMD tests and self-reports of parental hip fracture between 2006 and 2014. POPULATION
registry data for 1966-2014 were used to link offspring with their parents, and hospital records were used to ascertain parental fractures.Overall, 8,112 offspring met the inclusion criteria; 13. 6% had a parental hip fracture diagnosis in administrative data during an average of 32. 9 years of follow-up. Agreement between parental hip fracture from offspring reports and diagnoses in administrative data was good (? = 0. 68). The sensitivity of offspring reports was 0. 70 (95% confidence interval: 0. 67, 0. 73), and specificity was 0. 96 (95% confidence interval: 0. 96, 0. 97). Offspring characteristics associated with disagreement included male sex, northern rural residence, early BMD test year, and longer interval between BMD test and parental hip fracture diagnosis. This proof-of-concept study focused on hip fractures, but use of record linkage techniques to validate offspring-reported parental information can be extended to other conditions.