Out with .05, in with Replication and Measurement: Isolating and Working with the Particular Effect Sizes that are Troublesome for Inferential Statistics.

The Journal of general psychology

PubMedID: 29023206

Bradley MT, Brand A. Out with .05, in with Replication and Measurement: Isolating and Working with the Particular Effect Sizes that are Troublesome for Inferential Statistics. J Gen Psychol. 2017;1-8.
It is difficult to obtain adequate power to test a small effect size with a set criterion alpha of 0. 05. Probably an inferential test will indicate non-statistical significance and not be published. Rarely, statistical significance will be obtained, and an exaggerated effect size calculated and reported. Accepting all inferential probabilities and associated effect sizes could solve exaggeration problems. Graphs, generated through Monte Carlo methods, are presented to illustrate this. The first graph presents effect sizes (Cohen's d) as lines from 1 to 0 with probabilities on the Y axis and the number of measures on the X axis. This graph shows effect sizes of. 5 or less should yield non-significance with sample sizes below 120 measures. The other graphs show results with as many as 10 small sample size replications. There is a convergence of means with the effect size as sample size increases and measurement accuracy emerges.