Active iris vascular tufts bleeding successfully treated with argon laser photocoagulation.

European journal of ophthalmology

PubMedID: 29108395

Sarmad A, Alfaqawi F, Chakrabarti M, Mitra A, Mushtaq B. Active iris vascular tufts bleeding successfully treated with argon laser photocoagulation. Eur J Ophthalmol. 2017;0.
PURPOSE
Iris vascular tufts (IVT) are rare biomicroscopic capillary outgrowths from the pupillary margins. Patients are usually asymptomatic until presenting with blurred vision due to spontaneous hyphema or with raised intraocular pressure.

CASE REPORT
A 61-year-old woman presented to eye casualty with left eye (LE) blurred vision and discomfort for 1 day. Her external ocular examination was unremarkable and visual acuity was 6/6 in the right eye (RE) and 6/9 in the LE. Biomicroscopic examination revealed a 2-mm hyphema in her LE and bilateral multiple small IVT and active bleeding from IVT at the pupillary margin of the LE at the 5 o'clock position. Diagnosis of LE active bleeding from IVT was made and she underwent argon laser photocoagulation directed at the source of bleeding. The bleeding stopped immediately after the second burn. She was followed up for 3 months; her visual acuity was 6/5 and 6/6 in the RE and LE, respectively, with no further problems.

CONCLUSIONS
Iris vascular tufts are benign and recurrent hemorrhages are unlikely. Therefore, definitive argon laser photocoagulation or surgical treatment are reserved to arrest further episodes of hyphema. Our case demonstrates the effective use of argon laser photocoagulation to completely arrest active bleeding from IVT and excellent recovery of hyphema with no further problems for 5 years.