Emerging role for the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors genotype, in the susceptibility of skin diseases.

Journal of dermatological science

PubMedID: 23642663

Matusiak L, Bialynicki-Birula R, Szepietowski JC. Emerging role for the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors genotype, in the susceptibility of skin diseases. J Dermatol Sci. 2013;71(1):3-11.
NK cells are a major group of immune cells responsible for the phenomenon of natural, innate cytotoxicity. One of the better studied receptors of human NK cells are killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) responsible for checking the presence of MHC class I molecules, which serve as their ligands. Although previously treated as specific for NK cells, nowadays these receptors are known to also occur on T cells. Genetics of KIR molecules is very complicated, what create a great variability of haplotypes in various populations world-wide. In addition, some KIR are known to recognize HLA-C (epitopes C1 or C2), HLA-B (Bw4) or HLA-A (A3 and/or A11) molecules. Therefore, this makes a huge diversity of reactions among individuals, depending on the presence or absence of given KIR and their ligands, hence differential susceptibility to several diseases, including various dermatoses. This paper underlines the important role of both KIR genotypes and HLA class I genes with reference to the various skin diseases.