Postnatal development and fertility of offspring from mice exposed to triphenyltin (fentin) hydroxide during pregnancy and lactation.

Journal of toxicology and environmental health. Part A

PubMedID: 20563930

Sarpa M, Tavares Lopes CM, Delgado IF, Paumgartten FJ. Postnatal development and fertility of offspring from mice exposed to triphenyltin (fentin) hydroxide during pregnancy and lactation. J Toxicol Environ Health Part A. 2010;73(13-14):965-71.
Fentin or triphenylthin (TPT) is an organotin compound (OTC) widely used as an agricultural fungicide and miticide. It is well known that TPT exerts adverse effects on the reproductive and immune systems and may disrupt the endocrine system, raising concerns regarding the risks posed by exposure to this metal on environmental and human health. In this study the effects of maternal exposure to TPT at doses of control (0), 1.875, 3.75, or 7.5 mg/kg body weight/d, po, were examined during gestation and lactation on offspring growth, organ weights, and fertility. Except for a significant liver enlargement at the highest dose, TPT produced no maternal toxicity. Increased neonatal mortality (death of 3 entire litters from a total of 18 treated litters) was noted at 7.5 mg/kg. Pup body weight at birth was significantly reduced at all dose levels, but no marked weight loss was found on postnatal day (PND) 5 and thereafter. Offspring maturation (ear unfolding, incisor eruption, vagina opening, and testes descent) and fertility in adulthood were not significantly affected by maternal exposure to TPT. In conclusion, data provided by this study indicate that maternal treatment with TPT during pregnancy and lactation delayed prenatal growth but did not impair postnatal development and fertility in exposed offspring in adulthood.