Highly concordant coexpression of aromatase and estrogen receptor beta in non-small cell lung cancer.

Human pathology

PubMedID: 19800101

Abe K, Miki Y, Ono K, Mori M, Kakinuma H, Kou Y, Kudo N, Koguchi M, Niikawa H, Suzuki S, Evans DB, Sugawara S, Suzuki T, Sasano H. Highly concordant coexpression of aromatase and estrogen receptor beta in non-small cell lung cancer. Hum Pathol. 2010;41(2):190-8.
Estrogen receptor expression has been reported in non-small cell lung cancer. We examined the correlation between aromatase, a key enzyme in the synthesis of estrogen, and estrogen receptor expressions in 105 non-small cell lung cancer cases. All patients were older than 60 years, and all female patients were postmenopausal. Estrogen receptor alpha and progesterone receptor were detected in only 1 and 14 cases, respectively. Estrogen receptor beta and aromatase were positive in 75 and 89 cases respectively. Estrogen receptor beta expression in non-small cell lung cancer showed an inverse correlation with lymph node metastasis (P < .05). Only among females, both estrogen receptor beta and aromatase expressions were correlated with higher Ki-67 labeling index and younger age (P < .05). Among 89 aromatase-positive cases, 70 were positive for estrogen receptor beta, demonstrating a significant concordance (P < .05). Simultaneous immunohistochemical staining for aromatase and estrogen receptor beta showed a high rate of double positive association. Male non-small cell lung cancer cases with double positivity for aromatase and estrogen receptor beta demonstrated lower status in N factor by TNM classification (P < .05). In addition, among 89 aromatase-positive cases, a low-Allred total score of estrogen receptor beta showed a significant relationship with large tumor size and high T factor by TNM classification (P < .05). In conclusion, frequent coexpression of aromatase and estrogen receptor beta in non-small cell lung cancer might suggest some functional correlation between aromatase and estrogen receptor beta, whereas estrogen receptor beta negativity might be correlated with malignant progression of non-small cell lung cancer.