Factor XIII deficiency as a potential cause of supratentorial haemorrhage after posterior fossa surgery.

Acta neurochirurgica

PubMedID: 19557304

Vrettou CS, Stavrinou LC, Halikias S, Kyriakopoulou M, Kollias S, Stranjalis G, Koutsoukou A. Factor XIII deficiency as a potential cause of supratentorial haemorrhage after posterior fossa surgery. Acta Neurochir (Wien). 2010;152(3):529-32.
BACKGROUND
Postoperative intracranial haemorrhage can be a dramatic event, carrying significant morbidity and mortality. Bleeding at sites remote from the operation area represents a small percentage of haemorrhages whose aetiology remains unclear (Harders et al. Acta Neurochir (Wien) 74(1-2):57-60, 1985).

AIM
We present the case of a 60-year-old patient who underwent posterior fossa craniotomy for the removal of a space-occupying lesion and suffered supratentorial haemorrhage soon after the operation.

RESULTS
A thorough postoperative investigation revealed low levels of factor XIII (FXIII), the factor mainly responsible for fibrin clot stabilisation.

CONCLUSION
We suggest that reduced FXIII activity may be an important but preventable predisposing factor to remote postoperative haemorrhage in neurosurgical patients.