RIA reamings and hip aspirate: a comparative evaluation of osteoprogenitor and endothelial progenitor cells.

Injury

PubMedID: 21144931

Henrich D, Seebach C, Sterlepper E, Tauchmann C, Marzi I, Frank J. RIA reamings and hip aspirate: a comparative evaluation of osteoprogenitor and endothelial progenitor cells. Injury. 2010;41 Suppl 2S62-8.
Autologous bone grafting represents the gold standard modality to treat atrophic non-unions by virtue of its osteoinductive and osteoconductive properties. The common harvest site is the iliac crest, but there are major concerns due to limited volume and considerable donor site morbidity. Alternative autologous bone graft can be harvested from the femoral bone cavity using a newly developed 'Reamer Irrigator Aspirator' (RIA). Osseous aspirated particles can be recovered with a filter and used as auto-graft. The purpose of this study was to compare the concentration and differentiation potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) harvested with the RIA technique or from the iliac crest, respectively. RIA aspirate was collected from 26 patients undergoing intramedullary nailing of femur fractures. Iliac crest aspirate was collected from 38 patients undergoing bone graft transplantation. Concentration of MSC and EPC were assessed by means of the MSC colony assay, EPC culture assay and flowcytometry (CD34, CD133, VEGF-R2), respectively. Osteogenic differentiation of MSC's was measured by von Kossa staining. Patients in both groups did not significantly differ regarding their age, gender or pre-existing health conditions. In comparison to aspirates obtained from iliac crest the RIA aspirates from the femur contained a significantly higher percentage of CD34+ progenitor cells, a significantly higher concentration of MSC and a significantly higher concentration of early EPC. The percentage of late EPC did not differ between both sites. Moreover, the capability of MSC for calcium deposition was significantly enhanced in MSC obtained with RIA. Our results show that RIA aspirate is a rich source for different types of autologous progenitor cells, which can be used to accelerate healing of bone and other musculoskeletal tissues.