Physical fitness and perceived psychological pressure at work: 30-year ischemic heart disease and all-cause mortality in the Copenhagen Male Study.

Journal of occupational and environmental medicine / American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

PubMedID: 21701398

Holtermann A, Mortensen OS, Burr H, Søgaard K, Gyntelberg F, Suadicani P. Physical fitness and perceived psychological pressure at work: 30-year ischemic heart disease and all-cause mortality in the Copenhagen Male Study. J Occup Environ Med. 2011;53(7):743-50.
OBJECTIVE
Investigate if workers with low physical fitness have an increased risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality from regular psychological work pressure.

METHODS
Thirty-year follow-up of 5249 middle-aged men without cardiovascular disease.

RESULTS
Men perceiving regular psychological work pressure had no higher risk of IHD mortality than those who did not. Both among men perceiving regular and rare psychological work pressure, the physically fit had a reduced risk of IHD mortality referencing men with low physical fitness. For all-cause mortality, a stronger inverse association was found among men perceiving regular compared to rare psychological pressure at work.

CONCLUSIONS
Physical fitness is equally important for the risk of IHD mortality among men experiencing regular and rare psychological pressure at work, but stronger associated to risk of all-cause mortality among men experiencing regular psychological pressure at work.