Simultaneous detection of multiple genetic aberrations in single cells by spectral fluorescence in situ hybridization.

Cancer Research

PubMedID: 11221864

Slovak ML, Tcheurekdjian L, Zhang FF, Murata-Collins JL. Simultaneous detection of multiple genetic aberrations in single cells by spectral fluorescence in situ hybridization. Cancer Res. 2001;61(3):831-6.
Spectral fluorescence in situ hybridization (S-FISH) is a novel molecular cytogenetic approach that detects multiple disease-specific chromosomal aberrations in interphase nuclei using combinatorial fluorescence and digital imaging microscopy. A panel of six centromeric probes for chromosomes 7, 8, 9, 10, X, and Y, using a unique two-dye combination of four fluorophores, was developed to assess ploidy in breast tumors, bladder washings, and leukemia. Validation of S-FISH was performed by classic cytogenetics when metaphases were available or by standard fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses. S-FISH identified clonal aberrations in newly diagnosed breast tumors and recurrent bladder cancer and revealed minimal residual disease in hyperdiploid acute lymphocytic leukemia, providing "proof of concept." Like standard FISH, aberrations were identified in poor growth/no growth specimen at the single cell level; however, S-FISH provided increased sensitivity over standard FISH by surveying six genetic targets instead of one or two. Disadvantages of the current assay include labor intensive screening and interpretative challenges with signal overlap in highly aneuploid samples and focal plane distortions. S-FISH appears to be a sensitive oncology assay with significant clinical application for early detection of new or reemerging clones, allowing for earlier therapeutic intervention and development of probe panels for individualized therapy.