Comparison of Three-year outcomes after primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <40% versus = 40% (from the HORIZONS-AMI trial).

The American journal of cardiology

PubMedID: 23040595

Daneault B, Généreux P, Kirtane AJ, Witzenbichler B, Guagliumi G, Paradis JM, Fahy MP, Mehran R, Stone GW. Comparison of Three-year outcomes after primary percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction <40% versus = 40% (from the HORIZONS-AMI trial). Am J Cardiol. 2013;111(1):12-20.
Left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and multivessel disease (MVD) have been associated with greater mortality after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of LV dysfunction and MVD in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients from the Harmonizing Outcomes With Revascularization and Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction (HORIZONS-AMI) trial treated with primary PCI in whom baseline LV function was assessed using left ventriculography were included in this study. Early and late (3-year) outcomes were examined in groups of patients with reduced (<40%) and preserved (= 40%) LV ejection fractions (LVEFs), further stratified by the presence of MVD. A total of 2,430 patients were included. Patients with reduced LVEFs were older; were more likely to be women; were more likely to have histories of myocardial infarction, PCI, and heart failure; and were more likely to present in heart failure. Patients with reduced LVEFs had greater 30-day (8.9% vs 0.9%, hazard ratio 9.81, 95% confidence interval 5.23 to 18.42, p <0.0001) and 3-year (17.1% vs 3.7%, hazard ratio 5.03, 95% confidence interval 3.37 to 7.50, p <0.0001) mortality. Among patients with LVEFs <30% (n = 45), 30% to 40% (n = 157), 40% to 50% (n = 373), 50% to 60% (n = 659), and = 60% (n = 1,196), 3-year mortality was 29.4%, 13.5%, 6.4%, 3.8%, and 2.9%, respectively (p for trend <0.0001). MVD was associated with greater mortality in patients with preserved but not reduced LVEFs. By multivariate analysis, LV dysfunction was the strongest predictor of 30-day and 3-year mortality. In conclusion, the presence of LV dysfunction as assessed on baseline left ventriculography in patients who undergo primary PCI in the contemporary era is a powerful predictor of early and late mortality, regardless of the extent of coronary artery disease.