The triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio in adolescence and subsequent weight gain predict nuclear magnetic resonance-measured lipoprotein subclasses in adulthood.

Journal of Pediatrics

PubMedID: 20801459

Weiss R, Otvos JD, Sinnreich R, Miserez AR, Kark JD. The triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio in adolescence and subsequent weight gain predict nuclear magnetic resonance-measured lipoprotein subclasses in adulthood. J Pediatr. 2011;158(1):44-50.
OBJECTIVE
To assess whether the fasting triglyceride-to-high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (TG/HDL) ratio in adolescence is predictive of a proatherogenic lipid profile in adulthood.

STUDY DESIGN
A longitudinal follow-up of 770 Israeli adolescents 16 to 17 years of age who participated in the Jerusalem Lipid Research Clinic study and were reevaluated 13 years later. Lipoprotein particle size was assessed at the follow-up with proton nuclear magnetic resonance.

RESULTS
The TG/HDL ratio measured in adolescence was strongly associated with low-density lipoprotein, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and HDL mean particle size in young adulthood in both sexes, even after adjustment for baseline body mass index and body mass index change. The TG/HDL ratio measured in adolescence and subsequent weight gain independently predicted atherogenic small low-density lipoprotein and large VLDL particle concentrations (P < .001 in both sexes). Baseline TG/HDL and weight gain interacted to increase large VLDL concentration in men (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS
Adolescents with an elevated TG/HDL ratio are prone to express a proatherogenic lipid profile in adulthood. This profile is additionally worsened by weight gain.