Ventricular Performance Assessed by 2-Dimensional Strain Analysis After Ross Operation Versus Aortic Valve Reconstruction.

The Annals of Thoracic Surgery

PubMedID: 24011623

Raedle-Hurst TM, Hosse M, Hoffmann S, Abdul-Khaliq H, Schäfers HJ. Ventricular Performance Assessed by 2-Dimensional Strain Analysis After Ross Operation Versus Aortic Valve Reconstruction. Ann Thorac Surg. 2013;.
BACKGROUND
The Ross procedure is an established option for aortic valve replacement in young patients. It does, however, involve implantation of a valved conduit in the pulmonary position and dissection in the right ventricular (RV) myocardium with the possibility of RV impairment. Aortic valve reconstruction (AVr) may avoid the drawbacks of this method.

METHODS
To assess ventricular performance, 2-dimensional (2D) echocardiography and longitudinal strain analysis were performed in 19 patients after a Ross procedure and 19 patients after AVr and compared with 19 age-matched healthy controls.

RESULTS
Left ventricular (LV) volumes were significantly increased in both patient groups compared with controls (p < 0.05). Right ventricular (RV) volumes were significantly elevated in the Ross group compared with the AVr group (p < 0.05) and controls (p < 0.01). Peak longitudinal LV strain was significantly reduced in the Ross group (-14.8% ± 4.7%) compared with the AVr group (-18.8% ± 2.5%; p = 0.003) and healthy controls (-20.2% ± 3.9%; p = 0.001). Peak longitudinal RV strain was also significantly reduced in the Ross group (-21.8% ± 4.8%) compared with the AVr group (-25.1% ± 2.5%; p = 0.02) and healthy controls (-26.5% ± 3.2%; p = 0.003). Reduced RV strain was associated with increased pressure gradients of the pulmonary substitute (r = 0.48; p = 0.04) but not with follow-up time, RV volumes, or RV ejection fraction (EF).

CONCLUSIONS
Elevation of LV volumes can still be noticed in patients years after the Ross operation or AVr. Increased RV volumes and a reduced RV longitudinal strain are found after the Ross operation, indicating persistent systolic RV dysfunction even in patients with mild RV pressure overload.