Biodegradation of resin composites and adhesives by oral bacteria and saliva: A rationale for new material designs that consider the clinical environment and treatment challenges.

Dental materials : official publication of the Academy of Dental Materials

PubMedID: 24113132

Delaviz Y, Finer Y, Santerre JP. Biodegradation of resin composites and adhesives by oral bacteria and saliva: A rationale for new material designs that consider the clinical environment and treatment challenges. Dent Mater. 2013;.
OBJECTIVE
To survey the recent literature from the late 1980s to recent years in order to assess the relationship between resin degradation, catalyzed by biological factors, and clinical failure outcomes such as marginal breakdown.

METHODS
The literature shows that degradation occurs in many manufacturers' products despite varied vinyl acrylate compositions. The authors examine salivary enzyme activity and their ability to degrade the polymeric matrix of resin composites and adhesives, as well as oral microorganisms that can promote demineralization of the tooth surface at the marginal interface. A survey of recent research relating matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) to the degradation of the exposed collagen at the dentin adhesive interface is also discussed in the context of marginal breakdown.

RESULTS
The literature provides strong support that together, the above factors can breakdown the marginal interface and limit the longevity of resin composite restorations. The authors have found that the field's current understanding of resin biodegradation in the oral cavity is just beginning to grasp the role of bacteria and enzymes in the failure of resin-based restorations.

SIGNIFICANCE
Knowledge of these biodegradation processes is pertinent to areas where innovative strategies in the chemistry of restorative materials are anticipated to enhance the longevity of resin composites.