Impaired hepatic extraction and increased splanchnic production contribute to lactic acidosis in canine sepsis.

American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

PubMedID: 10673195

Chrusch C, Bands C, Bose D, Li X, Jacobs H, Duke K, Bautista E, Eschun G, Light RB, Mink SN. Impaired hepatic extraction and increased splanchnic production contribute to lactic acidosis in canine sepsis. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000;161(2 Pt 1):517-26.
In septic shock, the extent to which lactic acidosis (LA) is a consequence of splanchnic lactate overproduction (SLP) or impaired hepatic lactate extraction (HLE) is not clear. We examined SLP and HLE in E. coli sepsis in dogs. We further determined the effects of vasopressor treatments, which included phenylephrine, dopamine, norepinephrine, and a combination of dobutamine and norepinephrine treatment, on SLP and HLE in respective groups. The animals were studied while anesthetized and ventilated. During sepsis, SLP increased as compared with presepsis (-0.017 versus 0.07 mmol/min, p < 0.05), but this increase could not be explained by reduced splanchnic oxygen delivery (SOD). During sepsis, HLE increased as compared with baseline (0.8 versus 8%, p < 0.05), but was significantly lower than that found during lactic acid loading in nonseptic dogs. None of the vasopressor treatments had a detrimental effect on SLP. These results indicate that LA in sepsis occurs secondary to an increase in splanchnic lactate production that is not related to reduced splanchnic oxygen delivery, as well as to a decrease in hepatic lactate extraction. Effects of different vasoactive agents did not alter either splanchnic lactate production or hepatic lactate extraction in this sepsis model.