The inhibitors of histone deacetylase suberoylanilide hydroxamate and trichostatin A release nitric oxide upon oxidation.

Free radical biology & medicine

PubMedID: 19447172

Samuni Y, Flores-Santana W, Krishna MC, Mitchell JB, Wink DA. The inhibitors of histone deacetylase suberoylanilide hydroxamate and trichostatin A release nitric oxide upon oxidation. Free Radic Biol Med. 2009;47(4):419-23.
Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, vorinostat, Zolinza) is the lead compound of a new class of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors used as anticancer drugs that have been shown to affect multiple proteins associated with gene expression, cell proliferation, and migration. Studies have also demonstrated the essential role of the hydroxamate moiety of SAHA in HDAC inhibition. The ability of SAHA and its structural analog trichostatin A (TSA) to generate NO upon oxidation was tested directly, by spin trapping of NO using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, and also indirectly, via the determination of nitrite using the Griess assay. H2O2/metmyoglobin was used to oxidize SAHA and TSA. These studies demonstrate, for the first time, the release of NO from SAHA and its structural analog TSA. We tested the protective effects of SAHA, TSA, and valproic acid (VPA) in mammalian Chinese hamster V79 cells exposed to a bolus of H2O2 for 1 h and monitored the clonogenic cell survival. Both SAHA and TSA afforded significant cytoprotection when co-incubated with H2O2, whereas VPA was ineffective. These studies provide evidence for the release of NO by hydroxamate-containing HDAC inhibitors and their antioxidant effects. Such roles may be an added advantage of this class of HDAC agents used for epigenetic therapies in cancer.