Isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury and diastolic dysfunction in mice: structural and functional correlates.

Comparative medicine

PubMedID: 19712573

Brooks WW, Conrad CH. Isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury and diastolic dysfunction in mice: structural and functional correlates. Comp Med. 2009;59(4):339-43.
The objective of this study was to determine whether a simple, noninvasive method involving administration of isoproterenol could be used to produce myocardial injury and cardiac dysfunction in the mouse heart with a low incidence of mortality. Adult Swiss-Webster mice were injected with isoproterenol (100 mg/kg SC) once daily for 5 d. Myocardial histology and left ventricular (LV) function were assessed 10 to 14 d after the last isoproterenol injection in 14 surviving isoproterenol-treated mice and 15 saline-treated control mice. Left ventricular systolic and diastolic pressures were evaluated in vitro by means of isovolumically contracting, perfused Langendorff preparations. Isoproterenol induced marked endocardial injury, associated with hypertrophy of surviving myocytes, and an increase in myocardial fibrosis (collagen types I and III according to picrosirius red microscopy). The hearts from isoproterenol-treated mice demonstrated decreased LV compliance, as evidenced by an upward shift in the diastolic pressure-volume relationship, with normal LV systolic function. Isoproterenol administration provides a simple, noninvasive means to induce endocardial injury and diastolic dysfunction without significant impairment of systolic function. This model has a low incidence of mortality and may be useful to assess the effects of gene or stem cell therapy on cardiac dysfunction without the potential confounding effects of invasive procedures.