Self-generated learning in people with multiple sclerosis: an extension of Chiaravalloti and DeLuca (2002).

Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology

PubMedID: 17852591

Basso MR, Ghormley C, Lowery N, Combs D, Bornstein RA. Self-generated learning in people with multiple sclerosis: an extension of Chiaravalloti and DeLuca (2002). J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2008;30(1):63-9.
Although memory impairment is common in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), few interventions have been tested to remediate forgetfulness in MS. Chiaravalloti and DeLuca (2002) examined the memory benefit of self-generated encoding over didactic presentation in people with MS and a control group. They found that self-generated encoding enhanced memory of MS patients and a control group alike. The present study extended this finding by examining self-generated encoding in memory-impaired MS patients as well. A control group and MS patients with and without memory impairment learned word-pairs that were either self-generated or didactically presented. All groups remembered more self-generated words than those that were read aloud, and severity of memory impairment failed to moderate this memory benefit. Implications of these findings for cognitive rehabilitation and the nature of memory impairment in MS are discussed.