Resonance raman investigation of the specific sensing mechanism of a target molecule by gas sensory proteins.

Inorganic chemistry

PubMedID: 15859244

Ohta T, Kitagawa T. Resonance raman investigation of the specific sensing mechanism of a target molecule by gas sensory proteins. Inorg Chem. 2005;44(4):758-69.
Specific sensing of gas molecules such as CO, NO, and O2 is a unique function of gas sensory hemoproteins, while hemoproteins carry out a wide variety of functions such as oxygen storage/transport, electron transfer, and catalysis as enzymes. It is important in gas sensory proteins that the heme domain not only recognizes its target molecule but also discriminates against other gases having similar molecular structures. Coordination of a target molecule to the heme is assumed to alter the protein conformation in the vicinity of heme, and the conformation change is propagated to the effector domain where substrate turnover, DNA binding, or interaction with a signal transduction protein is performed differently than the binding of other gases. To understand the appearance of such a specificity, we focus our attention on the ligand-protein interactions in the distal side of heme. In practice, the metal-ligand vibrations as well as internal modes of ligand and heme are measured with resonance Raman spectroscopy for wild-type and some mutant proteins with full-length or limited sensory regions. On the basis of such observations together with the knowledge currently available, we discuss the mechanism of specific sensing of a diatomic molecule in gas sensory proteins.