Biochemical coupling of the two nucleotide binding domains of ClpB: covalent linkage is not a prerequisite for chaperone activity.

The Journal of biological chemistry

PubMedID: 16162497

Beinker P, Schlee S, Auvula R, Reinstein J. Biochemical coupling of the two nucleotide binding domains of ClpB: covalent linkage is not a prerequisite for chaperone activity. J Biol Chem. 2005;280(45):37965-73.
ClpB cooperates with the DnaK chaperone system in the reactivation of protein from aggregates and is a member of the ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities (AAA+) protein family. The underlying disaggregation reaction is dependent on ATP hydrolysis at both AAA cassettes of ClpB but the role of each AAA cassette in the reaction cycle is largely unknown. Here we analyze the activity of the separately expressed and purified nucleotide binding domains of ClpB from Thermus thermophilus. The two fragments show different biochemical properties: the first construct is inactive in ATPase activity assays and binds nucleotides weakly, the second construct has a very high ATPase activity and interacts tightly with nucleotides. Both individual fragments have lost their chaperone function and are not able to form large oligomers. When combined in solution, however, the two fragments form a stable heterodimer with oligomerization capacities equivalent to wild-type ClpB. This non-covalent complex regains activity in reactivating protein aggregates in cooperation with the DnaK chaperone system. Upon complex formation the ATPase activity of fragment 2 is reduced to a level similar to wild-type ClpB. Hence functional ClpB can be reassembled from its isolated AAA cassettes showing that covalent linkage of these domains is not a prerequisite for the chaperone activity. The observation that the intrinsically high ATPase activity of AAA2 is suppressed by AAA1 allows a hypothetical assignment of their mechanistic function. Whereas the energy gained upon ATP hydrolysis at the AAA2 is likely to drive a conformational change of the structure of ClpB, AAA1 might function as a regulator of the chaperone cycle.