The effect of prone position on respiratory mechanics during spinal surgery.

Middle East journal of anesthesiology

PubMedID: 16381267

Manna EM, Ibraheim OA, Samarkandi AH, Alotaibi WM, Elwatidy SM. The effect of prone position on respiratory mechanics during spinal surgery. Middle East J Anaesthesiol. 2005;18(3):623-30.
OBJECTIVE
To study the effect of prone position on respiratory mechanics during spine surgery.

DESIGN
Prospective study.

SETTING
Elective spine surgery at a university hospital.

PATIENTS
12 ASA physical I & II with no coexisting cardiorespiratory disease undergoing cervical or lumbar laminectomy under general anesthesia in prone position.

MEASUREMENTS
Ten min after induction of general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation, while patients were in supine position, the following measurements were taken using anesthesia delivery unit (Datex Ohmeda type A_Elec, Promma, Sweden): peak airway pressure (Ppeak), peak plataeu pressure (Pplat), peak mean pressure (Pmean) and dynamic lung compliance (DLC). The same measurements were recorded 10 min after placing patients into prone position. At the end of surgery and 5 min after turning the patients supine and before tracheal extubation, the same measurements were again recorded. The results expressed as means +/- sd. One way ANOVA was used for analysis of differences in the data before, during prone position and after turning patients supine at the end of the procedure. For all comparisons p < 0.05 was considered significant.

RESULTS
During prone position there was significant reduction in DLC and significant increase in airway pressures.

CONCLUSION
We conclude that turning the patients form supine to prone position during anesthesia for spine surgery caused significant decrease of DLC and significant increase of airway pressure.