Adhesive properties of a LamB-like outer-membrane protein and its contribution to Aeromonas veronii adhesion.

Journal of applied microbiology

PubMedID: 15012808

Vàzquez-Juárez RC, Romero MJ, Ascencio F. Adhesive properties of a LamB-like outer-membrane protein and its contribution to Aeromonas veronii adhesion. J Appl Microbiol. 2004;96(4):700-8.
AIMS
To identify and characterize nonfimbrial proteins from Aeromonas veronii involved in the attachment to epithelial cells in vitro.

METHODS AND RESULTS
Two Aer. veronii mucin- and lactoferrin-binding proteins with molecular masses of 37 and 48 kDa were identified by Western blot analysis. According to its N-terminal amino acid sequence, the 48-kDa protein was identified as Omp48, an outer-membrane protein similar to LamB of Escherichia coli. LamB is a well-known porin involved in maltose transport across the outer membrane in E. coli. In a microtitre plate assay, Omp48 bound to the immobilized extracellular matrix proteins collagen and fibronectin, and the mucin- and lactoferrin-binding activity was confirmed. Adhesion of Omp48 to mucin, lactoferrin and collagen was diminished by preincubation with homologous glycoproteins or other carbohydrates, suggesting a putative Omp48 lectin-like binding domain. Anti-Omp48 antiserum significantly inhibited the Aer. veronii adhesion to confluent HeLa cell monolayers and pretreatment of cells with purified Omp48 elicited competitive inhibition of adhesion. Similarly, cross-inhibition of Aer. hydrophila and Aer. caviae adhesion was achieved with the same treatments, indicating the existence of a conserved surface protein among these species.

CONCLUSIONS
Taken together, these data indicate that Omp48 is involved in Aer. veronii adhesion to epithelial cells and might be an alternative adhesion factor of this micro-organism.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY
The adhesive potential of Aeromonas spp. is correlated with pathogenicity; however, the adhesion mechanism is complex and not well understood. This study provides evidence of a putative adhesion factor that might be contributing to pathogenicity of Aer. veronii and could be used for vaccine development.