Are major risk factors for myocardial infarction the major predictors of degree of coronary artery disease in men?

Metabolism : clinical and experimental

PubMedID: 15015144

Phillips GB, Pinkernell BH, Jing TY. Are major risk factors for myocardial infarction the major predictors of degree of coronary artery disease in men?. Metab Clin Exp. 2004;53(3):324-9.
Although numerous cross-sectional studies have reported associations of hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, smoking, and/or obesity with the presence of coronary artery disease (CAD), correlations of these risk factors for myocardial infarction (MI) with the degree or progression of CAD have been less consistent. Nevertheless, these risk factors are generally assumed to be major determinants not only of MI, but of the degree of CAD as well. The present study is an attempt to evaluate the relationship of major risk factors for MI to degree of CAD. From 182 men who underwent diagnostic coronary arteriography, the 154 with CAD were selected for study. These 154 patients were divided into 2 groups, those with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, smoking, and/or obesity (n = 121) and those with none of these risk factors (n = 33). The mean degree of CAD in the group with risk factors for MI (44.4%) and in the group without (50.6%) was not significantly different (P =.15); nor was the increase in CAD with age augmented by the presence of these risk factors. On multiple regression analysis, none of these risk factors was associated with degree of CAD. Three other variables that were considered in this study, age, high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and free testosterone (FT), did show an independent association with degree of CAD. These findings, together with the findings of previous studies from other laboratories, raise the possibility that in men selected for coronary arteriography, age, HDL-C, and FT may be stronger predictors of degree of CAD than are blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes, smoking, and body mass index (BMI).