Increasing access to smoking cessation treatment in a low-income, HIV-positive population: the feasibility of using cellular telephones.

Nicotine & tobacco research : official journal of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco

PubMedID: 15203801

Lazev A, Vidrine D, Arduino R, Gritz E. Increasing access to smoking cessation treatment in a low-income, HIV-positive population: the feasibility of using cellular telephones. Nicotine Tob Res. 2004;6(2):281-6.
This study examined the feasibility of using cellular telephones to improve access to smoking cessation counseling in a low-income, HIV-positive population. Two pilot studies were conducted: (a). A survey of interest and barriers in participating in a smoking cessation intervention (n=49) and (b). a cellular telephone smoking cessation intervention in which participants were provided with free cellular telephones and received six telephone counseling sessions over a 2-week period (n=20). A primary care clinic serving a multiethnic, medically indigent, HIV-positive population served as the setting. Demographics and smoking status were assessed by self-report and expired-air carbon monoxide testing. In study 1, participants reported multiple barriers to participating in a smoking cessation intervention, including transportation, transience, and telephone availability. However, they also reported a high level of interest in participating in a smoking cessation intervention, with the greatest interest in a cellular telephone intervention. In study 2, 19 of the 20 participants successfully completed 2 weeks of smoking cessation counseling with a 93% (106 of 114 calls) contact rate. A total of 19 participants made a quit attempt, and the 2-week end of treatment point-prevalence abstinence rate was 75%. The provision of cellular telephones allowed for the implementation of a proactive telephone smoking cessation intervention providing an underserved population with access to care. Cellular telephones also may provide unique benefits because of the intensity of counseling and support provided as well as the ability to provide counseling in real-world, real-time situations (in vivo counseling).