[Invasive prenatal diagnosis in the Netherlands, 1991-2000: number of procedures, indications and abnormal results detected].

Nederlands tijdschrift voor geneeskunde

PubMedID: 15366724

Nagel HT, Knegt AC, Kloosterman MD, Wildschut HI, Leschot NJ, Vandenbussche FP. [Invasive prenatal diagnosis in the Netherlands, 1991-2000: number of procedures, indications and abnormal results detected]. Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2004;148(31):1538-43.
OBJECTIVE
To provide an overview of invasive prenatal diagnosis in the Netherlands during the period 1991-2000 and to analyse potential trends.

DESIGN
Retrospective.

METHOD
The annual results from all 13 Dutch centres for invasive prenatal diagnosis over the period 1991-2000 were combined and described, with particular emphasis on indications, number and type of invasive procedures, and number and type of abnormal results.

RESULTS
The percentage of pregnancies in which invasive prenatal diagnostics were carried out increased from 5% in 1991 to 6% in 1996 and remained at the same level until 2000. 'Maternal age' was the main reason for prenatal testing (69.2-73.3% of procedures). However, the number of pregnant women aged 36 or over increased by 69.9%. An abnormal result was found in an average of 4.7% of procedures, rising from 3.6% in 1991 to 5.4% in 2000. In 70.8% of cases with abnormal results, the pregnancy was terminated. Important trends were the relative decrease of cordocentesis (-82%) and chorionic villi biopsy (-18%) in favour of amniocentesis (+48%), and a strong decrease in the number of amniocentesis procedures on indication of increased risk of neural tube defect.

CONCLUSION
The total number of invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures remained stable. However, there was an important decrease in the percentage of pregnant women aged 36 or over who underwent invasive prenatal diagnosis without previous prenatal screening.