The relationship between systolic blood pressure and cardiovascular risk--results of the Brisighella Heart Study.

Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.)

PubMedID: 12556653

Borghi C, Dormi A, L'Italien G, Lapuerta P, Franklin SS, Collatina S, Gaddi A. The relationship between systolic blood pressure and cardiovascular risk--results of the Brisighella Heart Study. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2003;5(1):47-52.
We examined the relationship of systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, and pulse pressure to coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease risk in a prospective population-based European cohort. The Brisighella Heart Study included 2939 men and women between the ages of 14-84 without prior coronary heart disease or cerebrovascular disease and not taking antihypertensive therapy at baseline. Cox regression was used to obtain hazard ratios (HRs) for coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease as a function of baseline blood pressure parameters over a 23-year follow-up. Higher combined coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease risk was evident in comparison to the referent of <120 mm Hg, with a 44% increased risk at SBP 120-139 mm Hg (HR, 1.44; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00-2.09; p=0.052), 76% increased risk at SBP 140-159 mm Hg (HR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.16-2.69; p=0.009), and 109% increased risk at SBP >or=160 mm Hg (HR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.31-3.35; p=0.0021). Trends of increasing risk with increasing levels of blood pressure were significant for SBP and pulse pressure, (p<0.0001) but not for DBP (p=0.058). In this European cohort, SBP was a stronger predictor of coronary heart disease and cerebrovascular disease events than DBP, and an increase in risk was already evident with high-normal SBP (120-139 mm Hg). The prognostic significance of pulse pressure was also demonstrated. The importance of SBP as seen in the Framingham Heart Study may be generalized to a European population with differences in diet and other risk factors.