Problems of comparing blood glucose molality and molarity determined with an Omni, an EML 105 and an Ebio analyser.

Clinical chemistry and laboratory medicine : CCLM / FESCC

PubMedID: 12940524

Haeckel R, Hänecke P. Problems of comparing blood glucose molality and molarity determined with an Omni, an EML 105 and an Ebio analyser. Clin Chem Lab Med. 2003;41(7):950-7.
The comparability between glucose concentrations measured in various sample systems is still a matter of debate. Decision limits are usually determined in venous plasma and then converted to either blood or to the aqueous compartment (activity). The conversion factors recommended have not yet been generally accepted. In the present study, glucose concentrations were determined in blood and plasma with an Ebio analyser (molarity) and in the aqueous compartment with both an EML 105 and an Omni (molality). All analytical results were referred to the same aqueous standard solution. The Ebio results agreed with reference method values in control materials. Concentrations determined in the various sample systems from patients (molarity) correlated well with the molality values measured either with the EML or the Omni. However, the mean values of the EML were not consistent with those derived theoretically by considering the different water content. With the Omni, only molality values in whole blood appeared plausible, but not in plasma, although the two sample systems should provide identical molality values. The EML results were almost identical in whole blood and plasma. Theoretically, glucose molality would be the ideal diagnostic quantity. However, no diagnostic advantage of molality determined in whole blood with the Omni vs. molarity values could be detected in a group of 40 non-diabetic and 27 diabetic subjects.